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The question of whether Vance was dead or not became more than academic when he found himself in a bathtub up to his chin in ice water like some forgotten cocktail garnish, a demonic woman standing over him, and no memory of how he got there.
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Read free chapters of The Red Rook here (or get it here). -- Fritz Freiheit

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A few thoughts about writing rules

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There have a been a number of good blog posts about writing rules recently which lead to me to have the following thought in the shower (where else?) this morning. (Note and caveat: I am not a published author so take my thoughts on writing for what they are. Speculative.)

As a pre-published writer you are always hearing about this or that rule of writing. Some of my favorite rules are: show, not tell and kill your darlings. On the face of it, these are good rules. Or should I say, good advice. I find the term "rule" implies failure to follow said "rule" means you will have done something wrong. There is no such thing as a "writing rule". Or, at least, I can't easily identify a "writing rule" that some author hasn't broken to good effect. Which brings me to my shower thought.

Writing rules are context sensitive. You can't possibly know the entire context, because some of the context necessarily resides with the reader.

One of the things that this implies is that good writers are good readers. They know, explicitly or implicitly, what rules to apply and when. They know when to show and when to tell. They know when to kill their darlings and when not to. A good writer does these things because they grok how their work will be read.

Writing Rule (category) (e)

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