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Science fiction (genre)

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Science fiction (genre)

Science fiction is a fiction genre that uses significant speculative trappings that basically conforms to and/or does not violate known science at the time of its writing. Also known as SF and Sci-Fi. (Source: Fritz Freiheit)
(From Wikipedia) Science fiction is defined more by setting than by other story elements. With a few exceptions, stories set out of Earth or in the future qualify as science fiction. Within these settings, the conventions of almost any other genre may be used. A sub-genre of science fiction is alternate history where, for some specific reason, the history of the novel deviates from the history of our world. Pavane (1968) by Keith Roberts was an influential early alternate history, Harry Turtledove's The Guns of the South is another popular example. Of late, alternate history has come into its own as a distinctive and independent outgrowth from general science fiction. (Source: genre fiction at Wikipedia ) (e)

Subgenres of science fiction

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Definitions of Science Fiction

Opinions on Science Fiction


Science Fiction Subgenres

Science Fiction Series[edit]

Series Picks[edit]

Science Fiction Authors[edit]

Author Picks[edit]

Science Fiction Short Stories[edit]

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Science Fiction Anthologies[edit]

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Science Fiction Novels[edit]

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SF Tropes

From Wikipedia

From Wikipedia (as of 2007/12/29)

Science Fiction

Science fiction is a fiction genre that uses significant speculative trappings that basically conforms to and/or does not violate known science at the time of its writing. Also known as SF and Sci-Fi. (Source: Fritz Freiheit)
(From Wikipedia) Science fiction is defined more by setting than by other story elements. With a few exceptions, stories set out of Earth or in the future qualify as science fiction. Within these settings, the conventions of almost any other genre may be used. A sub-genre of science fiction is alternate history where, for some specific reason, the history of the novel deviates from the history of our world. Pavane (1968) by Keith Roberts was an influential early alternate history, Harry Turtledove's The Guns of the South is another popular example. Of late, alternate history has come into its own as a distinctive and independent outgrowth from general science fiction. (Source: genre fiction at Wikipedia ) (e)

A science fiction genre is a division (genre) of science fiction. Science fiction may further be divided along any number of overlapping axes.

(Sub-)Genres[edit]

Science[edit]

Genres concerning the emphasis, accuracy, and type of science described include:

  • Hard science fiction - a particular emphasis on scientific detail and/or accuracy
  • Soft science fiction - focus on human characters and their relations and feelings, while de-emphasizing the details of technological hardware and physical laws
  • Social science fiction - concerned less with technology and space opera and more with sociological speculation about human society

Characteristics[edit]

Themes related to science, technology, space and the future, as well as characteristic plots or settings include:

Movements[edit]

Genres concerning politics, philosophy, and identity movements include:

Eras[edit]

Genres concerning the historical era of creation and publication include:

  • Cyberpunk - noted for its focus on "high tech and low life" and taking its name from the combination of cybernetics and punk
    • Postcyberpunk - typically examining the social effects of a ubiquitous datasphere of computerized information, genetic engineering and modification of the human body, and the continued impact of perpetual technological change
  • Golden Age of Science Fiction - a period of the 1940s during which the science fiction genre gained wide public attention and many classic science fiction stories were published
  • New Wave science fiction - characterised by a high degree of experimentation, both in form and in content
  • Pulp science fiction
  • Scientific romance - an archaic name for what is now known as the science fiction genre, mostly associated with the early science fiction of the United Kingdom

Combinations[edit]

Genres that combine two different fiction genres or use a different fiction genre's mood or style include:

Creation[edit]

The marketing section of the science fiction publishing house or of a film production company will define the genre and subgenre of a work from experience (see genre fiction). Many publishers and production houses now specialize in genre and subgenre work. Publishers normally publish what they have experience with, so the criteria for defining genre or subgenre is whatever else is out there that is similar. A new definition usually comes about as a result of a buzzword included in the work that is considered an original subgenre. It is rare that a publisher will take on the challenge of a non-established genre or subgenre. Established writers are mostly responsible for creating new subgenres. On occasion a publisher may change the genre or subgenre of a work. They may also use multiple genres and subgenres.

Theory[edit]

The genre of a work is often discussed in academic circles and the conclusion of the genre or subgenre of a work may differ from the publishers or producers of the work. For example Gary K. Wolfe's Critical Terms for Science Fiction and Fantasy identifies over 30 definitions of SF not including speculative fiction and science fantasy.

Additional themes[edit]

See also[edit]

Also See


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